Group Think

Irving Jenness   Summary In considering how prominent groups are able to come to terrible decisions, Irving begins by asserting "Stupidity certainly is not the explanation" (p1), and instead concludes that such groups, as he has studied extensively, were "…victims of what I call "groupthink."" (p1).  The article subsequently explores this newly introduced phenomena by …

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Phenomenology and Working Together

Lately, my head has been (figuratively) stuck in a book of Husserl's introductory lectures on phenomenology. It's not easy and the understanding I have and continue to develop is an amorphous cloud through which some vague silhouettes of concepts which, when I try to articulate, I articulate poorly. So following is a poor articulation of …

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Attribution Theory and Collaboration

Bernard Weiner established "attribution theory" in 1985 as a framework of making sense of individuals responses to group dynamics and group output. Weiner asked participants of group work to account for the success or failure of the group, and following are four examples of the kinds of statements individuals made about their group, which I …

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S&R: Getting to No: Building True Collegiality in Schools

A Summary and Review of  "Getting to No: Building True Collegiality in Schools" by Robert Evans   Summary Evans begins by setting us in the context that collaborative skills are recognised as necessary in most schools in North America, and a necessary part of 21st century skills, citing David Sousa and Carol Tomlinson's work "Differentiation …

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